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Why You’re More Powerful Than You Think

Posted By Zoya Zayler, Tuesday, March 10, 2020
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

When you hear the word “power,” what comes to mind? If you had asked me this question a year ago, I would have said a CEO, a politician, perhaps even a social media influencer. But after being named one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women, I have a very different perspective on power.

Last year when Accenture submitted my nomination for the award, I thought they got it wrong. Me, powerful? As Accenture’s Canada lead for inclusion and diversity, I was confident of my expertise, my relevance and a certain amount of influence. Powerful, however, was not a word I would have ever used to describe myself. Truthfully, it made me pretty uncomfortable.

So, what exactly does it mean to be powerful?

On Power

I asked my closest friends what power means to them. I heard a wide range of responses that can be boiled down to two categories:

  1. Legitimacy in a social structure such as a person’s position, status or rank. Powerful people have authority, agency and can effect change.
  2. Personal characteristics such as influence, credibility, discipline, confidence and respect from others.

My husband summarized it in four words – charisma, likeability, results and leadership. And then there’s the Wikipedia definition of power as “the capacity of an individual to influence the conduct (behaviour) of others.”

So, what’s my takeaway from starting a conversation on power? That there are as many different definitions of power as the number of people I asked and the places I looked. Interestingly, WXN’s perspective on power varies further by specifically pointing out that the top 100 most powerful women in Canada aren’t necessarily powerful because they carry a certain title, but because:

“They are resilient and strong. They inspire, learn and grow. They have faced professional and personal challenges and come out stronger. They are champions and advocates for others.”

Now this definition I can get behind.

Rethinking Power

If we think about power in terms of resilience, personal growth and advocating for others, then we all have power – or at least the capacity to have it. We’re no longer restricted by external factors such as whether that top position opens up, whether others believe in our potential or whether business is booming. Instead, power is fully within our control.

As I look at power through this lens, I realize that many people around me who I hadn’t previously thought of as particularly powerful in the traditional sense actually have enormous amounts of power. My parents are one example. They left the Soviet Union with me and my brother under extremely challenging conditions, rebuilt their lives in Canada and are strong and passionate advocates for people and causes they care about. They are not CEOs, politicians or social media influencers, yet their power is tremendous.

Similarly, each of WXN Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women have an enormous amount of power. I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know many of them over the past few months, and their stories of personal strength, grit and empowering others are unmatched. I understand why each of them was selected, and why each is considered powerful.

Owning Your Power

“Powerfully empowered” is WXN’s 2019 theme for the Top 100 awards, which beautifully summarizes that every one of us has personal power. We are empowered to continue to grow, and we are especially empowered to advocate for others. Imagine a world where we all embrace the idea that advocating for others increases our personal power and the more we give back, the more power we gain.

One thought from WXN that particularly resonated with me is, “A strong woman stands up for herself but a powerful woman stands up for all of us.” Let’s stand up for others and let’s inspire, champion and advocate for those around us, for this is where our real power lies. Let’s own our power by continuing to learn and grow, share our experience with others and empower others through our actions and accomplishments.

If you already do this, then you’re more powerful than you think. And so am I.

Zoya Zayler, Canada Inclusion & Diversity Lead for Accenture, is a Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner in the Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders category for 2019. She has been recognized for her successive leadership positions within her organization and proven passion for learning and innovation.

2020 Top 100 Nominations open on International Women’s Day – March 8, 2020. Click here to learn more about Top 100 and nominate a powerful female or even yourself!


About Zoya:

Zoya ZaylerZoya Zayler is Canada Inclusion & Diversity Lead for Accenture.

2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner

Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders

Zoya Zayler drives Accenture Canada’s inclusion and diversity (I&D) strategy and provides the organization with strategic direction to achieve its I&D goals. A thought leader in this space, she has empowered Accenture to turn inclusion and diversity commitments into actionable practices that have advanced inclusivity and resulted in sustainable change. Zoya was recognized as the 2019 Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion D&I Practitioner of the Year and one of Human Resource Director’s 2018 Top 22 Most Promising Young HR Professionals in Canada.

Tags:  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  CMPW Top 100  D and I  Diversity  Diversity & Inclusion  Diversity and Inclusion  emerging leaders  Top 100  top 100 awards  women leaders  women leading women 

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Wisdom Mentoring - "a Highlight for me in my 25+ year Career"

Posted By Karry Murphy, Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Karry Murphy header

Meet Karry!

Karry Murphy headshotKarry Murphy - Advisor, Recognition Initiatives for VIA Rail Canada, participated in our 2018 Wisdom Mentoring Program. Here's her story:

"This past year (2018) has been a highlight for me in my 25+ year career. The WXN [Mentoring] program provided me with many “first experiences” which assisted in my development over the past year.

I was excited when I received the name of my mentor which included her position and company name. My mentor is with Canada Post. My father worked for Canada Post for over 36 years, I remember thinking to myself – “this must be fate”. I wrote to my mentor to introduce myself and her reply made me feel welcomed and excited for what the next few months would hold for me.

I recall my first in class session with WXN. Walking into the conference room, not knowing anyone and starting make introductions with other mentees. Everyone was filled with excitement, opportunity and a bit of nervousness. By the end of the first day, we were talking like we’ve known each other for years. Sharing career, personal stories and experiences.

My first one on one session with my mentor brought a new kind of nervousness to me. Knowing that I would be meeting with a CFO of a corporation and the need to fill up 45-60 minutes. I prepared myself with several questions prior to the call. Topic of interest to me was career advancement vs. personal/family commitments. I asked “What type of moves did you make during your career that required you to physically move for a promotion? Subsequently, what was the impact on your family?” We discussed this topic at length. She gave me some advice that proved me well when I was faced with this type of decision recently. My mentor reflected on her company and her employees who may be in a similar situation; how she could make some changes to consider the needs of the millennial generation. Making it a win-win topic for both of us.

Throughout this year, I’ve learned the importance of relationship building. This skill was key while launching a key initiative for our company as I worked with several different departments who held crucial functions to the launch of the program. Based on what I learned from my mentor and the in-class sessions, I was able to build upon my negotiation, network building, presentation and communication skills (both verbal and written) at many levels in the organization and with suppliers outside our organization. I experienced a new appreciation working closely with an executive of a company on making the best use of their time and learning how to communicate with the senior level team.

In the WXN program, we explored career planning at length. I’m happy to say the timing could not have been better. I was offered a new role managing the program I had launched as well I was nominated and won one of our company’s annual Distinction awards  which celebrates innovation, creativity and achieving success in project delivery. Career highlights for me to work extremely hard on program that I felt so passionate about, successfully launching and maintaining the momentum to inspire culture change.

Thank you WXN as mentoring gave me the courage to explore new territories and opportunities! 2018-2019 will be a year for the history books and looking forward to what this new chapter will bring my career."

The Wisdom Mentoring Program matches women with influential mentors, who can help them make their ambitions a reality.  Join the community of over 1000 women who have already taken their careers to the next level through this unique development opportunity.

Learn more about Wisdom Mentoring!


About Karry:

Karry Murphy is Advisor, Recognition Initiatives, for VIA Rail Canada.

VIA Rail logo

Tags:  Mentoring  wisdom  wisdom mentoring  women  Women empowering women  women leading women  WXN 

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