WXN Blog Posts
Blog Home All Blogs

How Tara Wilson Promotes Empowerment

Posted By Tara Wilson, Thursday, March 26, 2020
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Tara Wilson, SVP and General Manager at Paysafe’s Income Access is a 2019 Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders Top 100 Award Winner. Here’s her story:

Defining powerfully empowered

Being powerfully empowered is a responsibility. This includes developing both internal and external relationships. When done successfully, it can help build a brand of integrity, trust and inclusion. As someone who advocates for those values in the workplace, I feel a responsibility to empower, encourage and inspire people in their professional and personal lives. I am one of the lucky individuals who’s had strong advocates in my career for guidance and support when I wanted to give up. Now, it’s my turn to pay it forward.

In previous work environments, it was challenging to be hopeful about long-term career prospects. I wasn’t around many women leaders. To paraphrase Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In author: “I didn’t necessarily believe I deserved a seat at the table. I had imposter syndrome.”

Lean In was an eye-opener for me. It was the first time imposter syndrome, which describes those believing that their achievements weren’t “earned”, was explained in a way that was digestible. Leaving behind that mindset required continuous learning and listening to other people’s stories.

Eventually, I understood and embraced the reasons behind my recognition as a leader: I had earned it by putting in the work. Paysafe recognized my potential and drive and saw me as a person that could add value to our organization because of my passion, experience and skillset. They further encourage me by supporting my continued development.

Empowering individuals

Starting out from a data entry level and working hard to get where I am today, I understand the importance of being down to earth, relatable and open. I’ve been fortunate to hold several positions throughout my career that helped nurture these traits. Those experiences fostered a level of sociability allowing me to easily find common ground with my team, understanding what they go through on the frontline. I strive to share my knowledge gained throughout the years via active mentorship. Currently, I mentor over 20 individuals. Anything I can do to help people evolve their approach to achieving their goals is gratifying.

Working with WXN

Being a Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders award recipient was humbling. Part of that honor included an off-road driving experience on rocky terrain with the other WXN winners. Coincidentally, that experience mirrored the obstacles we sometimes confront throughout our careers.

Moreover, spending time with the winners and WXN CEO Sherri Stevens can’t help but make you feel powerful. If this wasn’t enough, WXN recognized us during an exceptional awards ceremony and through continuous content marketing support thereafter. All to say, they’ve done so much more than give me an award. They’ve connected me to other female leaders, shaping us as advocates for one another and future leaders. If you’re not already a WXN member, you should look at becoming one!

Leadership

The platinum rule, “do unto others as they would want done unto them,” is a rule I abide by in my day-to-day life. For a long time, leaders communicated with others using the golden rule, “do unto others as you would have them do unto you,” which I don’t believe is as impactful.

Good leaders understand individuals’ personalities, needs and communication style, which should be reflected when delivering feedback. I strongly believe that the way to get the best employee performance is to treat them the way they need to be treated and not the other way around. Kim Scott’s Radical Candor is a great resource on that topic.

A career-defining moment

In my past, I was asked to speak to vendors to sort out a costly business issue. The call included senior members at a former company (all men besides me). I began talking through my research, when I was interrupted by someone who commented that I shouldn’t “nag” the vendors to make my point. This prompted laughter from all on the call, completely deflating my morale. While I was still able to finish speaking, it was a defining moment in my career because it was finally clear that my contributions to the company weren’t appreciated. In that moment, I decided to move on.

Oftentimes, individuals go through experiences where they must make a similar decision. From my viewpoint, if you’re engaged, trying your hardest and producing quality work, but are not being seen or heard, you must evaluate if the leadership and work culture is a right fit for you.

D&I plans for 2020

Organizational diversity and inclusion (D&I) initiatives welcome employees’ unique traits. As a Paysafe D&I committee member, I believe that everyone deserves a voice. Those voices extend beyond women in business and include people with both visible and invisible characteristics like age, disability, race, sexual orientation and more.

My plans in 2020 are to elevate those around me by continuing to drive change and having the difficult conversations that may arise along the way.

Tara Wilson, SVP and General Manager at Paysafe’s Income Access is a 2019 Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders Top 100 Award Winner. She has been recognized as Canadian woman between the ages of 30 and 40 who has had successive leadership positions within her organizations and has proven a passion for learning and innovation.

2020 Top 100 Nominations are now open. Click here to learn more about Top 100 and nominate a powerful female or even yourself!


About Tara:

Tara WilsonTara Wilson, SVP and General Manager, Income Access (Paysafe Group)

2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner

Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders

Tara Wilson has almost two decades’ experience in the tech sphere and 16+ years’ expertise in operational leadership within the payments and marketing sectors.

Tara is both a mentor to others, helping them reach their maximum potential, and an advocate for Diversity & Inclusion, promoting the needs of women in the workplace and other frequently disempowered groups. In recognition of her achievements, Tara took home the 2018 Silver Stevie Award for Female Executive of the Year in Canada.

Tags:  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  CMPW Top 100  Diversity  Diversity and Inclusion  Emerging Leaders  Female Leaders  Inclusion  Inspiration  Leaders  Leadership  Mentoring  Powerful  Powerful women  Powerfully Empowered  Powerfullyempowered  Top 100  women empowering women  WXN 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why You’re More Powerful Than You Think

Posted By Zoya Zayler, Tuesday, March 10, 2020
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

When you hear the word “power,” what comes to mind? If you had asked me this question a year ago, I would have said a CEO, a politician, perhaps even a social media influencer. But after being named one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women, I have a very different perspective on power.

Last year when Accenture submitted my nomination for the award, I thought they got it wrong. Me, powerful? As Accenture’s Canada lead for inclusion and diversity, I was confident of my expertise, my relevance and a certain amount of influence. Powerful, however, was not a word I would have ever used to describe myself. Truthfully, it made me pretty uncomfortable.

So, what exactly does it mean to be powerful?

On Power

I asked my closest friends what power means to them. I heard a wide range of responses that can be boiled down to two categories:

  1. Legitimacy in a social structure such as a person’s position, status or rank. Powerful people have authority, agency and can effect change.
  2. Personal characteristics such as influence, credibility, discipline, confidence and respect from others.

My husband summarized it in four words – charisma, likeability, results and leadership. And then there’s the Wikipedia definition of power as “the capacity of an individual to influence the conduct (behaviour) of others.”

So, what’s my takeaway from starting a conversation on power? That there are as many different definitions of power as the number of people I asked and the places I looked. Interestingly, WXN’s perspective on power varies further by specifically pointing out that the top 100 most powerful women in Canada aren’t necessarily powerful because they carry a certain title, but because:

“They are resilient and strong. They inspire, learn and grow. They have faced professional and personal challenges and come out stronger. They are champions and advocates for others.”

Now this definition I can get behind.

Rethinking Power

If we think about power in terms of resilience, personal growth and advocating for others, then we all have power – or at least the capacity to have it. We’re no longer restricted by external factors such as whether that top position opens up, whether others believe in our potential or whether business is booming. Instead, power is fully within our control.

As I look at power through this lens, I realize that many people around me who I hadn’t previously thought of as particularly powerful in the traditional sense actually have enormous amounts of power. My parents are one example. They left the Soviet Union with me and my brother under extremely challenging conditions, rebuilt their lives in Canada and are strong and passionate advocates for people and causes they care about. They are not CEOs, politicians or social media influencers, yet their power is tremendous.

Similarly, each of WXN Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women have an enormous amount of power. I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know many of them over the past few months, and their stories of personal strength, grit and empowering others are unmatched. I understand why each of them was selected, and why each is considered powerful.

Owning Your Power

“Powerfully empowered” is WXN’s 2019 theme for the Top 100 awards, which beautifully summarizes that every one of us has personal power. We are empowered to continue to grow, and we are especially empowered to advocate for others. Imagine a world where we all embrace the idea that advocating for others increases our personal power and the more we give back, the more power we gain.

One thought from WXN that particularly resonated with me is, “A strong woman stands up for herself but a powerful woman stands up for all of us.” Let’s stand up for others and let’s inspire, champion and advocate for those around us, for this is where our real power lies. Let’s own our power by continuing to learn and grow, share our experience with others and empower others through our actions and accomplishments.

If you already do this, then you’re more powerful than you think. And so am I.

Zoya Zayler, Canada Inclusion & Diversity Lead for Accenture, is a Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner in the Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders category for 2019. She has been recognized for her successive leadership positions within her organization and proven passion for learning and innovation.

2020 Top 100 Nominations open on International Women’s Day – March 8, 2020. Click here to learn more about Top 100 and nominate a powerful female or even yourself!


About Zoya:

Zoya ZaylerZoya Zayler is Canada Inclusion & Diversity Lead for Accenture.

2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner

Mercedes-Benz Emerging Leaders

Zoya Zayler drives Accenture Canada’s inclusion and diversity (I&D) strategy and provides the organization with strategic direction to achieve its I&D goals. A thought leader in this space, she has empowered Accenture to turn inclusion and diversity commitments into actionable practices that have advanced inclusivity and resulted in sustainable change. Zoya was recognized as the 2019 Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion D&I Practitioner of the Year and one of Human Resource Director’s 2018 Top 22 Most Promising Young HR Professionals in Canada.

Tags:  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  CMPW Top 100  D and I  Diversity  Diversity & Inclusion  Diversity and Inclusion  emerging leaders  Top 100  top 100 awards  women leaders  women leading women 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why empowerment takes many forms for the Hon. Dr. Jean Augustine

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Wednesday, December 18, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Jean Augustine header

You might recognize the Honourable Dr. Jean Augustine as the first African-Canadian woman elected to the House of Commons; a former MP for 13 years; the Minister of State Multiculturalism and Status of Women Canada; a school principal with two public schools named after her; the driving force behind the placing of the Famous Five statue on Parliament Hill.

Jean AugustineAnd if you’ve been following WXN’s Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 announcements, you’ll know her as this year’s Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award Winner, too.

We could go on, really. Her accomplishments are as numerous as they are impressive. But if there’s one thread that winds through them, it’s one of empowering others. It’s just taken many different forms throughout the years.

Augustine the educator

Growing up in Happy Hill, Grenada through the 1940s, Augustine knew early on that she wanted to teach. In fact, teaching was her first job. So when she immigrated to Canada in 1960 to become a nanny, she was already qualified in education – but still had a journey ahead of her.

Education remained her focus early on in her career. She completed her education at Toronto Teachers College and earned her bachelor of arts at the University of Toronto. And while earning her masters of education, she taught elementary school with the Metropolitan Separate School Board in Toronto.

In the coming years, she rose from teacher to principal. Still, she never forgot her roots – or the kids she taught. “When I walk the streets and meet young people who I taught and who remember what I taught them, I feel I have made some contribution to their lives,” she told the National Post. “I feel that’s a really big achievement.”

Augustine’s now at 82 has never stopped teaching. She has two schools in her name. She continues her work with the Centre for Young Women’s Empowerment, where girls age seven to 17 learn everything from self-confidence and leadership skills to martial arts and yoga. York University’s Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora aims to advance access, equity and inclusivity in education.

Augustine the activist

After arriving in Toronto, Augustine noticed there was work to do. “There were so many things that I saw that needed activism, especially because I was an immigrant, black, Catholic woman,” she told the National Post. “Sometimes I was the only black face in the room or the only woman.”

She became active in Toronto’s Caribbean community, serving on the committee that organized the first Caribana festival in 1967. She founded the Toronto chapter of the Congress of Black Women of Canada (later becoming the organization’s national president). And she did all of that while volunteering with grassroots organizations fighting for women’s rights and combating violence against women, drug abuse and poverty.

She also spent time as the chair of the Metro Toronto Housing Authority where she provided leadership to people living in difficult housing situations.

Noted for her leadership in her community, government leaders approached her for help on important issues like the development and launch of Canada’s multiculturalism policy and training teachers in diversity and equity.

Augustine the politician

On Oct. 25, 1993, Augustine did something no African-Canadian woman had ever done: she won a seat in the Parliament of Canada.

Her work in her community and her activity in the Liberal Party put her on the radar of former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, who nominated her for a place in the coming election. Her stunning victory came at a time when her riding was less than one per cent African
Canadian.

In office, Augustine kept her activism going, championing a historic motion designating February as Black History Month in Canada and the Famous Five statue on Parliament Hill that honours five Alberta women who fought so that women could be considered “persons” under the law.

Before leaving her position as MP in 2006, she had served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Minister and Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women, Chair of the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Committee, Chair of the National Women’s Caucus, and in her final year, Assistant Deputy Speaker.

After leaving Parliament, Augustine did one last tour of duty as the first Fairness Commissioner in Ontario, where she set new standards for regulatory bodies on conditions for foreign-trained professionals. She stepped down in 2015.

Augustine the award winner

This year, Augustine added the Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award to her list of distinctions – and she was honoured to do so, she told the National Post.

“I’m deeply honoured that I was selected, simply because diversity and inclusion has been my life’s work,” she said.

The Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award resonated with the firm’s values and commitment to offering an inclusive environment where all people have a strong sense of belonging, can be their authentic selves, and have equal access to opportunities.

The Inclusion Vanguard award recognizes a leader, male or female, who has made a profound, thoughtful and measurable impact on diversity; who champions others; who betters the experience in the community around them. Through her work here in Canada, Augustine has done just that.

This award joins other accomplishments she has earned: the Order of Canada, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, seven honorary doctorates, and her appointment as Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her work in education and politics, to name a few.

Still, her work isn’t quite done yet. As she said in a response to a Speech from the Throne on Feb. 5, 2004, “I am living proof that we live in an open and inclusive society. But as long as people express that they have experienced racism and discrimination, we still have work to do.

“I am confident that the action we have already taken will benefit many generations after us. We must continue to act.”

To learn more about Jean Augustine, and our 2019 Top 100 Winners, visit our Top 100 winners page.

Tags:  CMPW Top 100  Diversity  Diversity and Inclusion  EDI  Equity Diversity and Inclusion  Inclusion  Top 100  WXN 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why confidence and conduct come first for Bill Morris

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Wednesday, November 20, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Bill Morris

Thirteen years ago, Bill Morris received some of the best advice of his life.

He was chatting with Accenture’s head of leadership development about parenting his then 14-year-old daughter. “She said to me, ‘Bill, you’ve got one job with your daughter: to give her confidence,” he remembers. “Do that and everything else will work out,” she assured him. Then, she added, “That applies to everybody you lead. And by the way, in particular, to women.”

Morris, who started with Accenture in Canada and recently retired after completing his second term, saw the organization grow from just 50 people to a workforce of 5,000 people across the country today.

“It was the most memorable piece of leadership advice I ever received,” Morris said.

Today, not only is he proud of his daughter, who is now a lawyer, but he’s seen his company make incredible strides toward some lofty goals, including a 40 per cent target for women in leadership positions and gender parity across its Canadian business by 2025.

Confidence comes first

While mentoring is well-established at professional service firms, Accenture’s research found that only one-third of women have a mentor compared with two-thirds of men.

“Helping your people be confident in themselves is a key aspect of mentoring,” Morris said. “It is now broadly understood that under-represented groups are under-mentored. We started tackling that issue years ago and I would now call it table stakes.”

But you can’t be confident if you’re not comfortable in the workplace, he adds. Through Accenture in Canada’s Conduct Counts program, the company measures workplace conduct in every business unit within every country. It helps leaders identify where improvements are needed.

“While most companies have ways to deal with misconduct when it happens, few have such a comprehensive system for driving improvement,” said Morris. “It creates the kind of environment where under-represented identities feel that, ‘I can thrive here because there are the standards of conduct that will make me feel like I can be myself,’” he said.

“Confidence and conduct come first. They are foundations upon which we were able to transform Accenture’s business in Canada.”

Five years ago, when Morris returned to start his second term leading Accenture in Canada, he took his investment plan forward for global approval. “Part of it was an extensive hiring plan at senior levels. I got what I asked for with one condition – that half the new hires would be women.  While that was music to my ears, I wasn’t sure we could pull it off.”

Over the next six months, his team consulted with recognized Canadian leaders in diversity and inclusion. They surveyed their clients, employees and alumni. “Our clients told us that they expected us to service them with gender parity teams. This finding was pivotal for us because it meant that we’d have a competitive advantage if we could be the first to do that.”

However, they also learned that, as a place where women can build their careers, Accenture was seen as being “in the middle of the pack.”

“These surveys gave us the business rationale to set our gender parity goal – which we did almost a year before we set the same goal globally.”

They then built an Excel model that modeled alternate pathways to the gender parity goals. It would predict what would happen if they adjusted variables like the gender mix of applicants and hires, along with the gap in retention and promotion between men and women.

Then the debates started. “It initially looked impossible, because we refused to compromise on meritocracy,” he remembers. But perseverance paid off. “Finally, we got to something that everybody on the team said, ‘We’re all in.’ And that was powerful because we invented it together.”

From that, Morris and his Canada Diversity Council – made up of his line of business and Employee Resource Group leads – leapt into action with initiatives like diversity moments, which became a staple in every meeting. “That’s where we discuss and debate topics like policy issues and unconscious bias at the start of each meeting,” he explained.

They also put the spotlight on sponsorship. Sponsors use their personal capital to advocate and intervene on an individual’s behalf. “Good mentors might not be the best sponsors. We especially wanted our women and diverse up-and-comers to have strong sponsors.”

Today, Morris is proud of the results. Of 1,100 employees hired last year, 50 per cent were women, and they’re on track to hit their company-wide 50-50 goal in 2025.

And when it comes to leadership opportunities for women, they’re now leading the pack. “When we started to hear from senior-level recruits in the Canadian marketplace that we had become the go-to place where they wanted to work for inclusion and diversity reasons – because we were not there five years ago – that was tremendously satisfying,” he said.

Morris has written a series of blogs about what worked for him and his team.

We are proud to partner with Accenture in Canada for the Inclusion Vanguard Award, a prestigious part of our annual Top 100 Awards! In 2017, we honoured Bill Morris for his outstanding contribution towards diversity and inclusion at Accenture and Canada-wide. At our 2019 Top 100 Awards on November 21, we will celebrate a new winner of the Inclusion Vanguard Award, recognizing a leader who has made a remarkable impact in driving real, lasting change. The Inclusion Vanguard Award symbolizes what we all strive to achieve: a stronger, more inclusive Canada!

The good work continues

The Inclusion Vanguard Award was a defining moment of that success for Morris and his team.

“It was market recognition that we had succeeded in becoming the best place for women to build a leadership career,” he said.

“Receiving this award, which came out of the blue, helped position us further and reinforced that feedback that we were getting from our recruits.”

And even though Morris has retired from Accenture, he says his experience is so deeply ingrained it’s a part of him now. “I was recently approached to give to a university. I told them I’d give if they set and met a gender mix target for their computer science faculty and student base. The targets would be their choice, not mine.”

Tags:  D and I  Diversity  Diversity & Inclusion  Diversity and Inclusion  EDI  Equity Diversity and Inclusion 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why Rich Donovan puts "delight" ahead of "diversity"

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Thursday, September 26, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, May 27, 2020

It was 2008 and Rich Donovan had just crunched the numbers on how many people live with disabilities worldwide.

The United Nations at the time reported the number around 600 million. His analysis pegged that population at 1.2 billion.

“I actually had to do the analysis three times because I didn’t believe the numbers. They were just too big,” he said. “It’s a pretty ballsy statement to make that the UN’s wrong by a factor of two, right?”

But he was right – and that’s the moment Donovan, founder of Return on Disability, author and past winner of the Women’s Executive Network’s 2018 Inclusion Vanguard Award, knew there was a huge, untapped opportunity touching 53 per cent of the world and worth an estimated $8 trillion.

Today, the number of people with disabilities has grown to 1.7 billion people, yet it’s an entire market that’s historically been overlooked. “From my perspective, this is the reason why every company that faces an end consumer, every government that faces an end citizen, should put [disability] at the core of their experience design,” he said.

That’s why he’s changing the conversation.

Building a new approach

In a world where companies talk about diversity and inclusion, Donovan is talking about something else entirely: markets and delighting customers.

Not surprising, given he used to manage about $6 billion in equity as a Wall Street trader. “The trader in me decided to treat disability as a market. I went about doing the analysis as I would for any other trade,” he said.

Trading is where his diversity journey starts, first through Merrill Lynch where he helped with on-campus recruitment efforts for women and visible minorities. “But we weren’t recruiting people with disabilities. In fact, nobody was. And so we decided as a group to add disabilities to that recruiting process.”

That led to Lime Connect, a third-party recruitment organization he founded in 2006 that grew out of those efforts. They connected with other big names like PepsiCo, Google and Goldman Sachs. It’s also where Donovan learned a key lesson: “It’s not about numbers and quotas; it’s about people. And people have desires to be the best that they can be.”

Therein lies the problem with a lot of diversity and inclusion programs, he said. “They haven’t taken the time or the effort, or made the investment, to really understand how those dimensions impact their revenue formula. They haven’t started to build these changes in demand into their product mix, their R&D mix, their customer experience.”

Now, with Return on Disability, he’s leading the charge on a new way of approaching the conversation. “This is more about, how can we best serve our customers? How can we best delight our customers?” he said.

“And the way you do that is you deliver to them what they want.”

Building momentum

Donovan’s decision to start a business focused on that premise was a huge risk, especially since no one else was having those conversations ten years ago.

“When you take a risk like we did, leaving a pretty good job and building something that was totally out of left field at the time, you realize that not many people do that,” he said.

We have honoured deserving recipients with the Inclusion Vanguard award annually, at our Top 100 Awards, since 2016.

That made winning the Inclusion Vanguard Award that much more meaningful, he added. It honours Canadian leaders, both male and female, who champion change and outstanding commitment to a broader diversity agenda within their organizations, clients and communities.

“At the end of the day, professionals don’t do things for awards; they do things for rewards. They do things for profit. They do things to better their business. But between today and the realization of the market, which could be ten years, you need some steps along the way to say yeah, you’re headed in the right direction.”

The award also signals that the conversation he started is becoming mainstream and reduces risk for others who want to follow his lead.

“It’s helpful for other companies to see this is something that you too can be successful at,” he said.

Building the future

Today, Return on Disability has 15 clients globally, ranging from multi-national banks to governments that embrace people with disabilities as valuable customers who drive growth and revenue.

Donovan’s also become an author, publishing Unleash Different last year, which chronicles his journey to Columbia Business School and beyond as a person living with a disability himself.

When he looks back on his accomplishments over the past 13 years, he’s encouraged by the change he’s seen… even if it’s slow-going.

“Organizations and brands are incredibly complex. They’re full of people with different needs, they’re full of corporate mechanisms that we navigate,” he said. “Change on this scale is a very difficult thing to do.”

He’s seen change pick up pace for those 1.7 billion people with disabilities worldwide and the people in their lives, in products like Google’s autonomous car, Amazon’s Alexa and even Disney characters that put accessibility first. He’s seen it in his own work and the work of his clients, too.

“We’ve proven our model and our work…Our clients have put packaging and commercial machinery and technology on shelves globally,” he said.

But there’s still work to do in the market – and he’s ready to do it. “We’re still talking 15 companies out of 5,000, and that doesn’t even include government. So the opportunity’s still there.”


We are proud to partner with Accenture for the Inclusion Vanguard Award, a prestigious part of our annual Top 100 Awards! In 2018, we had the absolute pleasure of honouring Rich Donovan for his extraordinary and notable actions towards diversity and inclusion in Canada. At our 2019 Top 100 Awards on November 21, we will celebrate a new winner of the Inclusion Vanguard Award, recognizing a leader who has made a remarkable impact in driving real, lasting change. The Inclusion Vanguard Award symbolizes what we all strive to achieve: a stronger, more inclusive Canada!

To learn more about the Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award and our Top 100 Awards, visit our Top 100 page.

Tags:  CMPW Top 100  D and I  Diversity  Diversity & Inclusion  Diversity and Inclusion  EDI  Equity Diversity and Inclusion  Inclusion  Top 100  WXN  WXN Top 100 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2