WXN Blog Posts
Blog Home All Blogs

A Top 100 Award Leads Women to That Journey of Success

Posted By Sanchari Sen Rai, Thursday, March 5, 2020
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Humbling. Exhilarating! This is what it felt like to be the winner of one of Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award.

To be a part of the Top 100 Summit, being amongst the most senior leaders in the industry; to be with them, connect with them, be a part of their discussions, it was a true learning experience.

To come to Canada as an immigrant, to start a business from my basement, to watch it grow into an all-women team and help over 15,000 students find placements in colleges and universities across Canada and around the world… This is a success story for all women, all immigrants, and especially, all immigrant women!

Being a Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award winner has re-enforced my belief that “Unless you return the knowledge you have you can’t grow within!” Hence, it’s imperative to continue growing one’s own knowledge. In 2019, I completed my continuing education and graduated. And how do I empower others? As a Co-founder and CEO of Education Consultants Canada (ECC), I recently hired two graduates to be a part of my all-women team. I strongly believe in giving opportunities to students, to do their internship with us and to work with us.

We all do business! But at ECC we aspire to do it a certain way, where our women employees leave with more than just job skills, they are empowered with vital communication and life skills that will carry them throughout their professional and personal journey.

As a winner of a 2019 Top 100 award, it gave the opportunity to experience the Resilience Retreat Workshop conducted by Bank of Montreal. Through interactions and exercises with other award winners, I learned my key leadership strength is empowering my team and I got to take away the feeling of wellness of mind, spirit and body from the workshop as it was about “building resilience from the inside out for women entrepreneurs”.

The theme for the 2019 Top 100 award was ‘A strong woman stands up for herself, but a powerful woman stands up for all of us”. This win is for my all-women’s team! They are the unsung heroes who are young adults just out of school, carrying the enormous responsibility of building, shaping careers, counselling students from all over the world and helping them to integrate into the diverse community.

The path to discovering my personal power as an immigrant woman started with a road-block. I had an academic degree with over 13 years of experience working overseas but could not get my accomplishments recognized when I moved to Canada. It made entering the workforce initially difficult. However, I preferred to look at the obstacles as challenges, and it led to carving a path of untapped opportunity, which has been instrumental in my journey. I wanted to ensure that others who arrived new to Canada didn’t have to face similar struggles, hence, ECC gives opportunities to the novice as a new hire, especially international students. I believe that for students to succeed in their studies in Canada, they have to be armed with right information and the right support structure. I knew I could make an enormous difference, not just to students, but also to Canada! When a student is nurtured to academic success, it paves the way for that student to decide to remain, integrate with the culture and diversity and be a part of the community. THAT is the dream! And ECC helps in aligning that “Canadian dream,” which every immigrant carries with them when leaving their home country.

A Top 100 award win encourages, inspires and recognizes the “unsung heroes”. Women who are pushing boundaries every day and by doing so inspiring and changing lives unknowingly. It is vitally important and a social obligation to give back to the community when one is in a position to do so. It is consequential because only then can one amplify one’s own knowledge, growth and succeed within and outside.

A Top 100 award leads women to “that” journey of success, by giving a forum to share their story of grit, experiences, and personal power that truly allows them to be in sync with diversity, empowerment and inclusion.

Sanchari Sen Rai, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Education Consultants Canada (ECC), is a Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner in the BMO Entrepreneurs category for 2019. She has been recognized as a women who owns and operates a thriving business in Canada.

2020 Top 100 Nominations open on International Women’s Day – March 8, 2020. Click here to learn more about Top 100 and nominate a powerful female or even yourself!


About Sanchari:

Sanchari Sen RaiSanchari Sen Rai is Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Education Consultants Canada (ECC).

2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner

BMO Entrepreneurs

Sanchari Sen Rai and her all-women team have helped thousands of international students work through the onerous process of applying to study in Canada, getting accepted and flourishing both academically and in their lives. Sanchari believes it is a vitally important social obligation for businesses to give back to the community when they are in a position to do so.

Tags:  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  Top 100  Top 100 Awards  Top 100 Winner  Top 100 Winners  Women  Women Entrepreneurs  Women in Business  Women in Leadership  Women Leaders  Women Leadership 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Becoming authentic women leaders

Posted By Clare Beckton, Tuesday, March 3, 2020
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Winning a 2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 award, my third, was another validation of the importance of my passion and work to advance women’s leadership. I am deeply honoured and appreciative to be recognized for my work as a champion for the advancement of women through helping them access and serve in leadership roles. When I was deputy head of Status of Women Canada, as it was then called, I recognized that without advancement of women into leadership and decision-making roles we cannot change what is happening in terms of equality and freedom from violence against women. Despite the many years of work to advance women’s equality, there continues to be under-representation of women in positions of leadership, a gender earnings gap, violence against women and continued efforts by some to silence women’s voices.

WXN has been a leader in promoting recognition of the power of women leading and empowering themselves to have an impact no matter their role or sector. Leading to create impact requires courage and the ability and desire to act despite fears of failure or push back. We know that seeing other women succeed is an inspiration for other women who can say if she can do it so can I.

When I was growing up in small town Saskatchewan, there were few role models for women in leadership roles. I was among a minority of women in our law school class and the only woman when I started teaching law at the age of 24. Needless to say, it was a challenge to navigate and I was fortunate to have some men who believed in me and helped me overcome some of the obstacles. I had the imposter syndrome despite my academic success which took some years to overcome. Later I met some female leaders in the government who could provide some guidance and help me see that the only road to success was being present at the table and adding our voice where decisions were being made. Many of the women, myself included, were subscribing to the mantra that women were victims in the system which took away our power. When a mirror was held up to the behavioural consequences of this thinking, we did not like what we saw. As a victim we give up our power to change the situation. Recognizing, through good coaching, that it was my choice to become a leader, instead of a victim, I began a different journey to success. A desire to make an impact helped to overcome fears and move forward.

One of the first steps was recognizing that I had to speak up in meetings and add my contributions in an empowered manner. I also accepted others may not share my point of view or perspective which was okay. Over time I realized my perspective was often different and added value to the discussion and decision making. At the same time, I began to truly understand leadership and focus on becoming a fully authentic women leader. Acting like the men, something I had observed from some of the very senior women when I entered government, was not aligned with my values. Many lost touch with their feminine side and paid a price. Recognizing, as I rose to more senior leadership roles, that I was now also a role model I worked to be authentic and make an impact. In the process I learned from failure and developed resilience to move again toward success  I also accepted that I might not be universally valued for this approach, but it was the only way for me to be a success in an authentic fashion. Mentoring others became an important part of my leadership.

Today, I know the importance of helping other women move forward with confidence in their own abilities. I can fully relate to this journey. Stereotypes abound in our society and we embody them without realizing it. Understanding these and making choices about how we will live and lead are so important to being our authentic selves and authentic leaders. I have chosen to devote my post career years to facilitate leadership programs and coach and mentor women to become fully authentic leaders, to seek their success on their own terms and to help mentor the next generation. Co-leading research respecting women entrepreneurs also helps me to support and encourage leadership by a powerful force of women. Interviewing so many amazing women entrepreneurs for my research and seeing so many young diverse women also receiving top 100 awards continues to inspire me in my work.

Clare Beckton BA LLP MPA, Executive in Residence, Centre for Research and Education on Women and Work at  Carleton University, is a Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner in the Championis category for 2019. She has been recognized as a woman who has made a describable difference to the advancement of women in the workplace.

2020 Top 100 Nominations open on International Women’s Day – March 8, 2020. Click here to learn more about Top 100 and nominate a powerful female or even yourself!


About Clare:

Clare BecktonClare Beckton BA LLP MPA is Executive in Residence, Centre for Research and Education on Women and Work at Carleton University

2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award Winner
RBC Champions

Clare Beckton is a champion for the advancement of women’s leadership, sought-after speaker, mentor, coach, facilitator and author of Own It: Your Success, Your Future, Your Life. She is a former professor of law, senior executive in the Canadian government including head of Status of Women Canada and founder of the Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership. Clare is co-author of A Force to Reckon With, Women Entrepreneurs and Risk and Everywhere, Everyday Innovating: Women Entrepreneurs and Innovation.

Tags:  authentic leadership  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  champions for women  CMPW Top 100  women champions  women leaders  women leadership. women leading women 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why empowerment takes many forms for the Hon. Dr. Jean Augustine

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Wednesday, December 18, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Jean Augustine header

You might recognize the Honourable Dr. Jean Augustine as the first African-Canadian woman elected to the House of Commons; a former MP for 13 years; the Minister of State Multiculturalism and Status of Women Canada; a school principal with two public schools named after her; the driving force behind the placing of the Famous Five statue on Parliament Hill.

Jean AugustineAnd if you’ve been following WXN’s Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 announcements, you’ll know her as this year’s Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award Winner, too.

We could go on, really. Her accomplishments are as numerous as they are impressive. But if there’s one thread that winds through them, it’s one of empowering others. It’s just taken many different forms throughout the years.

Augustine the educator

Growing up in Happy Hill, Grenada through the 1940s, Augustine knew early on that she wanted to teach. In fact, teaching was her first job. So when she immigrated to Canada in 1960 to become a nanny, she was already qualified in education – but still had a journey ahead of her.

Education remained her focus early on in her career. She completed her education at Toronto Teachers College and earned her bachelor of arts at the University of Toronto. And while earning her masters of education, she taught elementary school with the Metropolitan Separate School Board in Toronto.

In the coming years, she rose from teacher to principal. Still, she never forgot her roots – or the kids she taught. “When I walk the streets and meet young people who I taught and who remember what I taught them, I feel I have made some contribution to their lives,” she told the National Post. “I feel that’s a really big achievement.”

Augustine’s now at 82 has never stopped teaching. She has two schools in her name. She continues her work with the Centre for Young Women’s Empowerment, where girls age seven to 17 learn everything from self-confidence and leadership skills to martial arts and yoga. York University’s Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora aims to advance access, equity and inclusivity in education.

Augustine the activist

After arriving in Toronto, Augustine noticed there was work to do. “There were so many things that I saw that needed activism, especially because I was an immigrant, black, Catholic woman,” she told the National Post. “Sometimes I was the only black face in the room or the only woman.”

She became active in Toronto’s Caribbean community, serving on the committee that organized the first Caribana festival in 1967. She founded the Toronto chapter of the Congress of Black Women of Canada (later becoming the organization’s national president). And she did all of that while volunteering with grassroots organizations fighting for women’s rights and combating violence against women, drug abuse and poverty.

She also spent time as the chair of the Metro Toronto Housing Authority where she provided leadership to people living in difficult housing situations.

Noted for her leadership in her community, government leaders approached her for help on important issues like the development and launch of Canada’s multiculturalism policy and training teachers in diversity and equity.

Augustine the politician

On Oct. 25, 1993, Augustine did something no African-Canadian woman had ever done: she won a seat in the Parliament of Canada.

Her work in her community and her activity in the Liberal Party put her on the radar of former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, who nominated her for a place in the coming election. Her stunning victory came at a time when her riding was less than one per cent African
Canadian.

In office, Augustine kept her activism going, championing a historic motion designating February as Black History Month in Canada and the Famous Five statue on Parliament Hill that honours five Alberta women who fought so that women could be considered “persons” under the law.

Before leaving her position as MP in 2006, she had served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Minister and Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women, Chair of the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Committee, Chair of the National Women’s Caucus, and in her final year, Assistant Deputy Speaker.

After leaving Parliament, Augustine did one last tour of duty as the first Fairness Commissioner in Ontario, where she set new standards for regulatory bodies on conditions for foreign-trained professionals. She stepped down in 2015.

Augustine the award winner

This year, Augustine added the Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award to her list of distinctions – and she was honoured to do so, she told the National Post.

“I’m deeply honoured that I was selected, simply because diversity and inclusion has been my life’s work,” she said.

The Accenture Inclusion Vanguard Award resonated with the firm’s values and commitment to offering an inclusive environment where all people have a strong sense of belonging, can be their authentic selves, and have equal access to opportunities.

The Inclusion Vanguard award recognizes a leader, male or female, who has made a profound, thoughtful and measurable impact on diversity; who champions others; who betters the experience in the community around them. Through her work here in Canada, Augustine has done just that.

This award joins other accomplishments she has earned: the Order of Canada, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, seven honorary doctorates, and her appointment as Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her work in education and politics, to name a few.

Still, her work isn’t quite done yet. As she said in a response to a Speech from the Throne on Feb. 5, 2004, “I am living proof that we live in an open and inclusive society. But as long as people express that they have experienced racism and discrimination, we still have work to do.

“I am confident that the action we have already taken will benefit many generations after us. We must continue to act.”

To learn more about Jean Augustine, and our 2019 Top 100 Winners, visit our Top 100 winners page.

Tags:  CMPW Top 100  Diversity  Diversity and Inclusion  EDI  Equity Diversity and Inclusion  Inclusion  Top 100  WXN 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Top 100 winners share: 6 ways we can all be powerful

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Tuesday, December 10, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Top 100 Lessons Learned

Power. Is it your physical strength, the amount of money you have or your title within your organization? Or is it the way you give unselfishly, meet adversity with bravery and stand up for others?

“Our mission and challenge to you today is redefining what power means to you,” said Sherri Stevens, Owner and CEO of WXN and CBDC. It’s a call-to-action she shared with all of us during this year’s Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Awards Summit and Gala at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on Nov. 21, 2019.

And to help us all on that mission (should you choose to accept it): our Top 100 Winners, who shared their stories and knowledge with a crowd of over 1,200 women and allies.

So what can we do in our daily lives to be powerful and make that mission a reality? Here are six lessons from our speakers and winners.

1.      Learn it, earn it and return it

Success doesn’t happen in a silo. When one person succeeds, we all succeed, said Rola Dagher, president of Cisco Canada and 2019 Top 100 award winner. Hence her philosophy of “Learn it, earn it and return it” – no matter where you are in your career, if you’ve been blessed with an opportunity, use it to support and uplift those around (and those who follow in your footsteps).

2.      Quit that stinkin’ thinkin’

People fear what they don’t understand, said Victoria LaBillois, a Mi’gmaq entrepreneur, president of Wejuseg Construction, owner of Wejipeg Excavation, mentor for Indigenous women and 2019 Top 100 award winner. That’s why we have to do everything we can to create opportunities for other people, be bold and step into our power.

3.      Know who you’re fighting for

It’s a basic truth of life, said Melissa Grelo, co-host of CTV’s The Social and 2019 Top 100 award winner: we can’t know what we’re fighting for if we don’t know who we’re fighting for. Those of us who have privilege must understand that many of our sisters start their fight from a different level. How do we fix that? Stand next to them, but never in front of them. Help make their voices heard. 

4.      Leave the armour behind

“Can you think of a situation where you’ve seen a leader step out with courage and vulnerability?” asked Jenn Lofgren, founder and executive coach at Incito Executive and Leadership Development and 2019 Top 100 award winner. It starts with understanding what it really means to be vulnerable and accepting (even embracing) that things are going to be uncomfortable sometimes. Now that’s courage.

5.      Break the silence

Samra Zafar, author of A Good Wife: Escaping the Life I Never Chose and 2019 Top 100 award winner, knows what it’s like to be silent. Married as a teenager to a much older man, abused throughout her marriage and denied access to the education she desperately wanted, Zafar was not alone – there are millions living the life she used to know. That’s why it’s up to us to break the silence for those silences that are yet to be broken.

6.      Think seven generations ahead

Mohawk wisdom teaches us that, in the decisions we make today, we must not focus on the impact to our own grandchildren but rather on our great-grandchildren’s great-grandchildren – the seventh generation to come. That philosophy fuels WXN Hall of Fame alumni Roberta Jamieson’s goal of making sure every Indigenous youth graduates school through her organization, Indspire.

 

Congratulations again to all of our winners, past, present and future – and thank you for sharing your wisdom!

Tags:  Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100  powerfully empowered  stand up for diversity  Top 100  Women  Women Leaders  WXN 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why confidence and conduct come first for Bill Morris

Posted By Women's Executive Network, Wednesday, November 20, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 28, 2020

Bill Morris

Thirteen years ago, Bill Morris received some of the best advice of his life.

He was chatting with Accenture’s head of leadership development about parenting his then 14-year-old daughter. “She said to me, ‘Bill, you’ve got one job with your daughter: to give her confidence,” he remembers. “Do that and everything else will work out,” she assured him. Then, she added, “That applies to everybody you lead. And by the way, in particular, to women.”

Morris, who started with Accenture in Canada and recently retired after completing his second term, saw the organization grow from just 50 people to a workforce of 5,000 people across the country today.

“It was the most memorable piece of leadership advice I ever received,” Morris said.

Today, not only is he proud of his daughter, who is now a lawyer, but he’s seen his company make incredible strides toward some lofty goals, including a 40 per cent target for women in leadership positions and gender parity across its Canadian business by 2025.

Confidence comes first

While mentoring is well-established at professional service firms, Accenture’s research found that only one-third of women have a mentor compared with two-thirds of men.

“Helping your people be confident in themselves is a key aspect of mentoring,” Morris said. “It is now broadly understood that under-represented groups are under-mentored. We started tackling that issue years ago and I would now call it table stakes.”

But you can’t be confident if you’re not comfortable in the workplace, he adds. Through Accenture in Canada’s Conduct Counts program, the company measures workplace conduct in every business unit within every country. It helps leaders identify where improvements are needed.

“While most companies have ways to deal with misconduct when it happens, few have such a comprehensive system for driving improvement,” said Morris. “It creates the kind of environment where under-represented identities feel that, ‘I can thrive here because there are the standards of conduct that will make me feel like I can be myself,’” he said.

“Confidence and conduct come first. They are foundations upon which we were able to transform Accenture’s business in Canada.”

Five years ago, when Morris returned to start his second term leading Accenture in Canada, he took his investment plan forward for global approval. “Part of it was an extensive hiring plan at senior levels. I got what I asked for with one condition – that half the new hires would be women.  While that was music to my ears, I wasn’t sure we could pull it off.”

Over the next six months, his team consulted with recognized Canadian leaders in diversity and inclusion. They surveyed their clients, employees and alumni. “Our clients told us that they expected us to service them with gender parity teams. This finding was pivotal for us because it meant that we’d have a competitive advantage if we could be the first to do that.”

However, they also learned that, as a place where women can build their careers, Accenture was seen as being “in the middle of the pack.”

“These surveys gave us the business rationale to set our gender parity goal – which we did almost a year before we set the same goal globally.”

They then built an Excel model that modeled alternate pathways to the gender parity goals. It would predict what would happen if they adjusted variables like the gender mix of applicants and hires, along with the gap in retention and promotion between men and women.

Then the debates started. “It initially looked impossible, because we refused to compromise on meritocracy,” he remembers. But perseverance paid off. “Finally, we got to something that everybody on the team said, ‘We’re all in.’ And that was powerful because we invented it together.”

From that, Morris and his Canada Diversity Council – made up of his line of business and Employee Resource Group leads – leapt into action with initiatives like diversity moments, which became a staple in every meeting. “That’s where we discuss and debate topics like policy issues and unconscious bias at the start of each meeting,” he explained.

They also put the spotlight on sponsorship. Sponsors use their personal capital to advocate and intervene on an individual’s behalf. “Good mentors might not be the best sponsors. We especially wanted our women and diverse up-and-comers to have strong sponsors.”

Today, Morris is proud of the results. Of 1,100 employees hired last year, 50 per cent were women, and they’re on track to hit their company-wide 50-50 goal in 2025.

And when it comes to leadership opportunities for women, they’re now leading the pack. “When we started to hear from senior-level recruits in the Canadian marketplace that we had become the go-to place where they wanted to work for inclusion and diversity reasons – because we were not there five years ago – that was tremendously satisfying,” he said.

Morris has written a series of blogs about what worked for him and his team.

We are proud to partner with Accenture in Canada for the Inclusion Vanguard Award, a prestigious part of our annual Top 100 Awards! In 2017, we honoured Bill Morris for his outstanding contribution towards diversity and inclusion at Accenture and Canada-wide. At our 2019 Top 100 Awards on November 21, we will celebrate a new winner of the Inclusion Vanguard Award, recognizing a leader who has made a remarkable impact in driving real, lasting change. The Inclusion Vanguard Award symbolizes what we all strive to achieve: a stronger, more inclusive Canada!

The good work continues

The Inclusion Vanguard Award was a defining moment of that success for Morris and his team.

“It was market recognition that we had succeeded in becoming the best place for women to build a leadership career,” he said.

“Receiving this award, which came out of the blue, helped position us further and reinforced that feedback that we were getting from our recruits.”

And even though Morris has retired from Accenture, he says his experience is so deeply ingrained it’s a part of him now. “I was recently approached to give to a university. I told them I’d give if they set and met a gender mix target for their computer science faculty and student base. The targets would be their choice, not mine.”

Tags:  D and I  Diversity  Diversity & Inclusion  Diversity and Inclusion  EDI  Equity Diversity and Inclusion 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 3 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8